Friday, 7 October 2016

Hacking the Atom - Cold Fusion lives - or does it?

Some readers may have noticed this little bit in my sidebar personal description
"Cold Fusion Advocate (but sceptical)"

Here is news of a new book - Hacking the Atom - which documents the twists and turns of the "Cold Fusion" field. It shows that whatever was seen originally was not actually fusion-in-a-test-tube at all, which is the hypothesis that got the physics establishment in an uproar, but is actually a form of weak neutron capture - which might explain the experimental results much better without blowing such a big hole in conventional nuclear physics

In the words of the author (Steve Krivit):

 "For 27 years, an intense conflict, mostly hidden, has continued at the leading edge of energy science. My new book, Hacking the Atom, discusses scientific evidence —  experimental and theoretical —  confirming that changes to atomic nuclei do occur with low-energy nuclear reactions (LENRs). For a century, scientists thought such processes were not possible.

My book contains the first explanation — written for scientists and non-scientists alike — of the Widom-Larsen theory of LENRs. It shows why the theory is viable and consistent with well-accepted physics. This theory has nothing to do with the erroneous idea of room-temperature nuclear fusion, nor fission.

LENR research is in the early stages of scientific and technological exploration. Japanese companies, including Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Toyota Central Labs, and Nissan Motor Corp., have been quietly researching LENRs as a new source of green energy that doesn't emit hard radiation or greenhouse gases or produce long-lived radioactive waste.

Energy companies, including Royal Dutch Shell and Repsol, have been following the research. So have NASA, the U.S. Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity, the U.S. Army Research Laboratories, Sandia National Laboratories, and the U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency. Research in LENRs is being sponsored by the National Natural Science Foundation of China and the Japanese New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization.

If you have an interest in this developing field, my book is available at Amazon. You can also download a sample chapter, the table of contents and the index from my Web site."

If the link to the book given does not work try


Disclosure. I know Steve Krivit but I have no commercial relationship with him.


Wednesday, 3 February 2016


Hello everyone. And, at least in this type of forum, goodbye. This blog is now likely to stay quiescent for the foreseeable future. I do most of my environmental campaigning these days, apart from my work on government panels, on Facebook in these groups "Global Warming Fact of the Day", "Jersey Climate Action Network", “Jersey in Transition”, "Jersey Soil - the soil will save us" and “Solar Cities Biogas Innoventors” Facebook tends to get far more views than blogs do. Thanks for reading and commenting – even the fruitcakes…

Wednesday, 7 August 2013

14! 21! Vivaldi + Pachelbel’s Canon. Lose yourself in glorious ecstatic music!

Vivaldi Tribute, played by Tina (14 y.o.), played on her Vigier Excalibur, taught and filmed by her teacher Renaud Louis-Servais ( )
"Presto" is the 3d movement from Antonio Vivaldi's "Summer", from the "Four Seasons".This version is an extract from Patrick Rondat's guitar adaptation in his "Amphibia" album (1996).

and while we’re in guitar hero mode, an almost historic (2005/8!) intertubes sensation – Funtwo (click this link for his website) plays Pachelbel’s canon. His real name is Jeong-Hyun Lim from Seoul, Korea. Lim's video is the fifty-sixth most viewed and tenth most favourited video on YouTube, as of June 26, 2011, with over 90 million views and counting.

And here’s how he has refined it by 2012. Probably this doesn’t quite have the raw edge of the original.

and the original "classic" version



Friday, 17 May 2013

No title necessary

On the 40th anniversary of the famous ‘Blue Marble’ photograph taken of Earth from space, Planetary Collective presents a short film documenting astronauts’ life-changing stories of seeing the Earth from the outside – a perspective-altering experience often described as the Overview Effect. Worth going directly to Vimeo for to see the full sized video.

The “overview effect”, that the astronauts talk about, was pretty much predicted by Theodore L. Thomas, in a short story in “Astounding”, in August 1956 edition – before man had even been to space for the first time. The title of this was “The Far Look”. Unfortunately, it does not seem to be available on the web.

OVERVIEW from Planetary Collective on Vimeo.


Tuesday, 14 May 2013

Goody versus baddies plus spirit of humanity

Here is a very funny spoof documentary from Click this link for the full story starring Bill Oddie as a naturalist exploring the territory of that not-quite-human species, the feral banker (homo fatuscatus).
Bill got evicted from the bank while filming.

And here, just because I like it and we see the Earth in all its magnificence, is the viral (6.5 million views since yesterday) of Commander Chris Hadfield in the ISS singing modified lyrics to David Bowie’s Space Oddity


Wednesday, 20 March 2013

Aqua Lung Ocean Wings +

Flying under water. Reminiscent of the post I did with the under water wheelchair (Not the Paralympics), here’s the latest from the inventive French. I will do more environmental posts soon, I promise….


They glide downwards using the “wing” and ballast and use a gas bottle buoyancy device to get back to the surface; have a look at

Aqua Lung Oceanwings / The underwater human flight experience

And now, in complete contrast to the former dreamy sequence, here is the latest wing suit mayhem. Don’t get confused by the smoke – it’s not jet propulsion à la Yves (Jetman) Rossy - it’s 1) so one we can see their track better and 2) so they can see each other better as they manoeuvre in narrow spaces at very high speeds.

Dream Lines IV - Wingsuit proximity by Ludovic Woerth & Jokke Sommer


Friday, 1 February 2013

Perspective, Giddiness and Magic

This wonderful video was shot a few days ago in New Zealand. It shows the Moon rising in real-time - this is not a time lapse – over Mount Victoria Lookout in Wellington, N.Z.

Take four minutes out of your day to watch this and wonder at the dance of the planetary spheres in the dark of space, and sense how small we are. Feel giddy!

Source: NASA